Saturday, 27 August 2011

The Great and the Beautiful

We live in a world that seems to worship its own kind of greatness and produce its own kind of heroes. Popular tv shows  like Greek or American Idol X-Factor or Master Chef and reality television shows that are anything but reality, capitalize on this exact thing. Oprah Winfrey needs only mention a product on her "Favourite Things" list and the sales skyrocket. Athletes' are paid exorbitant amounts of money while teachers struggle on fixed income schedules. We have video games like Guitar Hero and Worlds of War Craft, where one becomes a "hero" by beating the game. It makes one wonder at our standard of measuremen when it comes to greatness.



Howard W. Hunter writes:

It's true that most of the world's heroes don't last very long in the public mind; but, nevertheless, there is never a lack of champions and great achievers. We hear almost daily of athletes breaking records; scientists inventing marvelous new devices, machines, and processes; and doctors saving lives in new ways. We are constantly being exposed to exceptionally gifted musicians and entertainers and to unusually talented artists, architects, and builders. Magazines, billboards, and television commercials bombard us with pictures of individuals with perfect teeth and flawless features, wearing stylish clothes, and doing whatever it is that "successful" people do.
Because we are being constantly exposed to the world's definition of greatness, it is understandable that we might make comparisons between what we are and what others are-or seem to be-and also between what we have and what others have. Although it is true that making comparisons can be beneficial and may motivate us to accomplish much good and to improve our lives, yet we often allow unfair and improper comparisons to destroy our happiness when they cause us to feel unfulfilled or inadequate or unsuccessful. Sometimes, because of these feelings, we are led into error and dwell on our failures while ignoring aspects of our lives that may contain elements of true greatness.

To me the elements of true greatness lie in little deeds of kindness in our daily lives like a loving parent, a true friend, a faithful companion, sharing your sandwich with a homeless person, loving yourself as you really are so that you can love others. This is the essence of the great and the beautiful.




4 comments:

Christina P said...

Most of us are encased in our ego, we try hard to promote ourselves, to earn social status and recognition, to be successful 'cos we think that this will make us great. We often forget that the really great in this world are those who sacrificed their own ego to benefit others, such as Mother Teresa and Martin Luther King. Excellent post Constantine mou.

Olga said...

Το μεγαλείο της ψυχής είναι η πραγματική ομορφιά που αντιστέκεται στο χρόνο. Ολα τ'αλλα....ματαιότης ματαιοτήτων!

Anastasia said...

True greatness can only be achieved through humility,generosity, kindness and love.

Katie said...

There are more miserable people in NYC than great ones. How sad...